Skip to main content

About your Search

20111001
20111031
SHOW
STATION
MSNBCW 10
MSNBC 8
LANGUAGE
English 18
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
MSNBC
Oct 30, 2011 7:30am EDT
smoke for a living. they manufacture their special formula of hyperallergenic smoke fluid which is used to supply the smoke machines that fill the haunted houses that creep you out at halloween. >> when we started the business, it was more of a necessity, for a family entertainment center. >> a necessity, because they worked at a family-run laser tag center which used fog. and it was something which triggered chris' asthma, smelled terrible, and irritated customers' eyes. >> i had some respiratory issues with the fluid we were using. so we set out to try and at least make a version that was, for me, breathable. >> it was not that we were ever going to sell the product. it was just, can we make something that is better for the kids, and better for our employees, and better for us? >> with nothing on the market to solve these problems, they worked with a chemist to formulate their own pharmaceutical grade artificial fog-making fluid. >> we developed a product that was really cool. and, you know, for our use it was perfect. we didn't need it for anybody else. we just needed it for us. >> t
MSNBC
Oct 23, 2011 7:30am EDT
want, i would have to say, benefits us the most. >> reporter: the line promises the same quality of service at more affordable prices. but before he opens a single door, rossano wants to know as much as possible about his potential clients. >> i have to study the demographics differently for expansion. i have to actually do it the old-fashioned way. i have to be in the area, presently, and looking for sites myself, and getting the feel of the area, studying what's important. are there schools around there. are there banks. are there, in some areas, community centers? >> and those aren't the only things he wants to know, either. >> we do look at the population of families. how many are in an average household. are people working in the area? >> rossano has spent hours talking with local real estate agents and developers. he even visits potential locations to see which businesses locals frequent the most. >> i actually sit in the parking lot. and i do that on usually every day of the week now. and i look at what would somebody be like? is it a busy center? we drive the area. we loo
MSNBC
Oct 16, 2011 4:30am PDT
to me, to hear about the conversations they had, and how it went. because it also went easy for us. but i think we were also the open and very fair about our conversations, which i think a lot of people aren't. so what do you think are some of the biggest pitfalls that people approach when hiring a ceo? >> well, i think you need to, in this situation, you need to make sure that you share the same values. you share the same vision and the same mission. you can't really be on separate pages there. now you can debate this strategy, but if you can align in those key areas i think that's just a key to getting off and sustaining a great progress. >> and how do you figure that out? do you figure that out in a conversation? i mean for me it was a feeling. we had good conversations, i just sensed this was a good guy and i trust him. >> i think figuring it out is -- is a step past where the real brilliance is. the real brilliance is deciding, we need to do this. i think it's a lot less usual than you might think. about a third of the ceos of the former owns are that i work with shouldn't rea
MSNBC
Oct 29, 2011 5:30am EDT
and knowing what clients want, i would have to say benefits us the most. >> they promise the same service atmore affordable services. before he opens a single door, he wants to know about his potential clients. >> i have to study the demographics for expansion. i have to do it the old fashioned way. i have to be in the area presently and looking for sights myself and getting the feel of the area. studying what's important. are there schools around there. are there banks. are there, in some areas community centers. >> they aren't the only things he wants to know, either. >> we look at the population family, how many in an average household. are people working in the area. >> he talks with local real estate agents and investors. >> i actually sit in the parking lot and i do that on usually every day of the week now. i look at what would somebody be like? is it a busy center. we drive the area. we look at a five-mile radius of the location to look for key sights. >> once the new space has been picked, he'll fall back on his experience at bernards to start the marketing. he's known for making
MSNBC
Oct 8, 2011 5:30am EDT
winnie the poo or very old fashioned. i wanted something sporty, my husband could use it. i could hang it on a stroller. i came up with that idea. it's not that long ago the looks were very old fashioned. since then, people picked up and did a modern design on baby. >> skipping beyond the traditional diaper bag, they have an array of products all over the world. after two businesses failing, the ultimate test that skip hop is here to stay was their performance during the economic downturn. >> 2008 was difficult for everyone in this category. a lot of companies questioned, are they real? is there real demand for my product or riding a wave? in 2009, we saw that our products were still very much in demand. we knew that we had built something meaningful. we really reached our customer in a unique way. it's not a luxury purchase, but parents really wanted to have our products in an up or down market. >>> when a small business doesn't work, it can certainly be devastating, but as we just saw, it can be a great learning experience to build from. let's turn to this week's board of directors f
MSNBC
Oct 9, 2011 7:30am EDT
telling us a story earlier about something you showed him, and it wasn't exactly right. >> i got thrown all the way out of this office. he went screaming through the hall, saying i never want to see this guy again, because he thought it wasn't going to be ready to ship. and then todd rulon miller, the head of sales, said steve wants to see you tomorrow, i thought he was going to apologize. todd goes no, he's going to shoot you a couple more times. steve and i walked around the campus at next and he said, look, we have to ship this on time. i said steve it's going to ship. he said, okay, fine, it's going to ship. now you need to change the interface. wait a second, you just said it needs to ship. now if we change the interface, it's going to be way behind shipping time. he goes i don't care, you're going to chain the interface. i want you to fly the development team here tomorrow. i am going to sit with them. he did that. spent five hours. they changed the interface. the team went in a little bunker and i had to go get one of the team members out of the psych ward it got so crazy. >> tha
MSNBC
Oct 15, 2011 2:30am PDT
that vision. >> you were telling us a story about something you showed him and it wasn't right. >> i got thrown out of his office. he said i never want to see this guy again. i loaded software. he thought it wasn't going to be ready to ship. then the head of sales says steve wants to see you tomorrow. i thought he was going to apologize. he said no, he's going to shoot you a couple times. he said look, we have to ship this on time. i said steve, it's going to ship. he said fine. now we need to change the interface. wait you just said it needs to ship. he goes i don't care. i want you to fly the development team here tomorrow. i'm going to sit with them. he did that. they went in a bunker and i actually had to get a team member out of the psych ward it was so crazy. >> everything we have heard and heard about him. for small business owners he's a real inspiration because of what you were talking about. he's so passionate. he cared so much. he saw what nobody else saw and made it happen. it's what entrepreneurs do. >> you used the term tireless innovation. i's a great phrase. it's somethin
MSNBC
Oct 22, 2011 5:30am EDT
the conversations they had and how it went. it went easy for us, but i think we were all really open and fair about our conversations, which, i think a lot of people aren't. what do you think are some of the biggest pitfalls people approach when hiring a ceo? >> i think, in this situation, you need to make sure you share the same values, the same vision and mission. you can't be on separate pages there. you can debate the strategy and tactics but if you can align in those areas, it's a key to sustaining a great progress. >> how do you figure that out? is it in a conversation? for me, it's a feeling. i sense this is a good guy and i trust him. >> figuring it out is a step past where the real brilliance because the brilliance is deciding we need to do this. i think it's a lot less usual than you might think. a third of the ceos that i work with shouldn't be ceos. >> they can't give it up. >> only 5% more. i think it's the recognition. then it's getting the roles right. the thing i loved here was they clarified the roles clearly. get at least one of the big dogs in the company, employees to come right
MSNBC
Oct 1, 2011 2:30am PDT
designer. we expect investors to receive 100% return on their investment. you can find us online or facebook. this is an exciting opportunity. join us on the movement and help keep it warm. >> that was so good. i don't usually put my input in. nice job but i am not the investor or potential investor. scott, what did you think of the pitch? >> flaw lsz. as a student, i'm impressed that people can pitch like you did. who creates your product? how do you make the story more compelling. there's situations in the united states and abroad where that will help you in your pitch and add to the wow factor. i would like to know how you are going to get it out there. you have a cause and a school involved. i want to know how i'm going to get my money back. i love the product. >> think about distribution channels and how to get the feedback to the investors. how are you going to show them, case studies a youtube video? something to make it more exciting. get the human side involved? >> would you take another meeting? i think it's obvious. >> yes. >> i would. >> this is such a good story. it
MSNBC
Oct 2, 2011 4:30am PDT
feel, very sporty, my husband could use it, and i was able to hang it on a stroller. so i came up with that concept for skip hop. it's not that long ago. but the looks were very old-fashioned in the baby space, and since then, everyone's picked up, and has done very modern design on baby. it just was time. >> skipping far beyond their original visionary diaper bag, the company now sells an array of innovative, award-winning products, all over the world. after having two businesses fail, the ultimate test that skip hop is here to stay was their performance during the recent economic downturn. >> 2008 was a very difficult year for everyone in this category. and it caused a lot of companies to question, you know, are they real? you know, is there a real demand for my product, or was this kind of riding a wave? and i think when we came in 2009, and saw that, you know, our products were still very much in demand, we knew that we sort of, we had built something that was really meaningful. that we really reached our customer in a unique way. that it wasn't some, you know, luxury purchase
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)